Your Cart: £0.00
Visit the Shop
 

Playing cards have been with us since the 14th century, when they first became a part of popular culture, perhaps seen as a miniature model of the universe. Over the centuries packs of cards, in all shapes and sizes, have been used for games, gambling, education, conjuring, advertising, fortune telling, political messages or the portrayal of national or ethnic identity. Their popularity is undoubtedy due to the imaginative artwork and graphic design which is sometimes overlooked, and the “then & now” of how things have changed.

Latest Articles

No.4 Special Whist

Posted by Simon Wintle •  March 22, 2018 at 06:59pm

No.4 Special Whist (American Skat) playing cards made by the Russell & Morgan Printing Company, 1889. Read more →

Pinocchio

Posted by Simon Wintle •  March 22, 2018 at 11:48am

Pinocchio fairy tale playing cards illustrated by Iassen Ghiuselev for Lo Scarabeo, 2003. Read more →

Jeu Grotesque

Posted by Simon Wintle •  March 21, 2018 at 02:11pm

Jeu Grotesque was first published in France c.1800. Read more →

Dal Negro Bridge set

Posted by Simon Wintle •  March 20, 2018 at 10:16am

Dal Negro Bridge set featuring old Vienna pattern courts. Read more →

Film Stars

Posted by Simon Wintle •  March 16, 2018 at 12:19pm

Film Stars from the 1960s with photography by Sam Levin. Read more →

Faraway Tree

Posted by Simon Wintle •  March 16, 2018 at 12:01pm

Faraway Tree was first published in 1950 based on the stories by Enid Blyton. Read more →

Carte Romane

Posted by Simon Wintle •  March 15, 2018 at 11:59am

“Carte Romane” designed by Giorgio Pessione, 1973, celebrating the history of Rome. Read more →

Cuccù

Posted by Simon Wintle •  March 14, 2018 at 10:22am

Cuccù or Cucco, an ancient Italian card game, published by Masenghini, 1979. Read more →

Sarde Pattern

Posted by Simon Wintle •  March 11, 2018 at 10:53am

Sarde pattern published by Modiano, c.1975, based on early XIX century Spanish model. Read more →

Triestine Pattern

Posted by Simon Wintle •  March 10, 2018 at 04:33pm

The Triestine pattern is derived from the Venetian (Trevisane) pattern but with its own characteristics. Read more →

back to top