Playing cards have been with us since the 14th century, when they first entered popular culture. Over the centuries packs of cards, in all shapes and sizes, have been used for games, gambling, education, conjuring, advertising, fortune telling, political messages or the portrayal of national or ethnic identity. Their popularity is undoubtedy due to the imaginative artwork and graphic design which is sometimes overlooked, and the “then & now” of how things have changed.

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Jeu de Memoire

Posted by Rex Pitts •  September 05, 2020 at 09:15pm

Jeu de Memoire card game promoting Véritable Chaumes cheese from the village of St Antoines in south west France. Read more →

Lever Brothers miniatures

Posted by Rex Pitts •  September 03, 2020 at 05:14pm

Two miniature card games promoting Vim Scouring Powder and Sunshine Soap, 1930s. Read more →

Middle Ages

Posted by Rex Pitts •  September 02, 2020 at 07:46pm

Middle Ages by Germano & Cª, (Litografia Maia), Read more →

Deutsche Nutzpflanzen

Posted by Rex Pitts •  August 29, 2020 at 02:43pm

Deutsche Nutzpflanzen - Quartett game promoting Kali brand crop fertilizer, 1938. Read more →

Hungarian Drinking Skat

Posted by Rex Pitts •  August 27, 2020 at 04:59pm

Hungarian Drinking Skat, c.2004. Read more →

Märchen-Quartett

Posted by Rex Pitts •  August 26, 2020 at 10:22am

Märchen-Quartett (Fairy Tales) illustrated by J. P. Werth and published by J. W. Spear & Söhne, c.1915. Read more →

One Penny Games

Posted by Rex Pitts •  August 25, 2020 at 05:48pm

One Penny Card Games, 1920s. Read more →

Heraldic playing cards

Posted by Rex Pitts •  August 22, 2020 at 02:07pm

Reproduction of Richard Blome’s Heraldic playing cards, 1684, presented to lady guests at WCMPC Summer Meeting in 1888. Read more →

Tell Wilmoś

Posted by Rex Pitts •  August 22, 2020 at 10:03am

Facsimile of ‘Wilhelm Tell’ Hungarian deck by Salamon Antal, Keczkemét, 1860. Read more →

Tonalamatl

Posted by Rex Pitts •  August 14, 2020 at 07:23pm

Baraja Tonalamatl Mexican Aztec playing cards based on the prehispanic Codex Borgia manuscript. Read more →

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