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Playing Cards from Latin America

Latin American Playing Cards

Playing cards had been introduced to the Americas with explorers such as Columbus or Cortés, whose fellow countrymen were keen gamblers. Cards were imported from Spain since the 16th century. Local production usually imitated Spanish cards.

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Fournier No. 55 1940

Fournier No. 55

Naipes Intransparentes de Una Hoja No.55 made by Hijos de Heraclio Fournier (Vitoria) for exportation to Argentina, c.1940.

Francisco Girbau & Cia, Buenos Aires

Francisco Girbau & Cia, Buenos Aires

Francisco Girbau & Cia, Buenos Aires, c.1890-1935

Giuseppe Cattino

Giuseppe Cattino

Playing cards manufactured in Italy by Giuseppe Cattino and Paolo Montanar for Spanish markets.

Grimaud Spanish pattern 1880

Grimaud Spanish pattern

Grimaud Spanish pattern, c.1880

Instituto Nacional de Calidad 2006 awards 2006

Instituto Nacional de Calidad 2006 awards

Spanish-suited playing cards made specially for the Instituto Nacional de Calidad 2006 awards.

J. F. Sanchez - Buenos Aires c.1895 1895

J. F. Sanchez - Buenos Aires c.1895

J. F. Sanchez - Buenos Aires c.1895.

J. M. Gandarillas, Buenos Aires, c.1815 1815

J. M. Gandarillas, Buenos Aires, c.1815

Playing cards believed to have been designed in 1815 by the Chilean immigrant Manuel José Gandarillas in Buenos Aires and published the following year.

Joker S.A.

Joker S.A.

Playing cards manufactured by Joker S.A.

Justo Rodero e Hijos

Justo Rodero e Hijos

Justo Rodero e Hijos, playing card manufacturer in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Lagos del Sur Souvenir 1980

Lagos del Sur Souvenir

Lagos del Sur Souvenir playing cards published by Gráfica S.A., Buenos Aires, c.1980.

Las Cartas de Tacuabe by Manos del Uruguay 2001

Las Cartas de Tacuabe by Manos del Uruguay

Tacuabé was a Charrúa native from Uruguay, an indigenous tribe that became extinct following European conquest and colonisation.

Latin American Playing Cards

Latin American Playing Cards

Playing cards had been introduced to the Americas with explorers such as Columbus or Cortés, whose fellow countrymen were keen gamblers. Cards were imported from Spain since the 16th century. Local production usually imitated Spanish cards.

Mesmaekers Spanish Pack, c.1875 1875

Mesmaekers Spanish Pack, c.1875

Mesmaekers Spanish Pack for export to Spanish colonies and South American countries, c.1875

Minifusor Clásico 1980

Minifusor Clásico

Minifusor Clásico, a modern re-drawing of the Catalan pattern published by Difusora, c.1980.

Naipe Cantaclaro

Naipe Cantaclaro

A colourful version of the Spanish Catalan pattern from Colombia, with a crowing cockerel on the 4 of cups.

Naipe de Bridge 1970

Naipe de Bridge

Standard English pattern pack made in Ecuador, c.1970.

Naipes ‘Baccarat’ 1980

Naipes ‘Baccarat’

An example of the typical version of the Spanish Catalan pattern which is widely used in South American countries, especially Argentina, Chile and Uruguay.

Naipes ‘Retruco’

Naipes ‘Retruco’

Naipes ‘Retruco’ published by Fantasias S.A., Montevideo, c.1980.

Naipes Artiguistas, 1816 1815

Naipes Artiguistas, 1816

Naipes Artiguistas published in Concepción del Uruguay, Entre Rios province (Argentina) in 1816, by Fray Solano García.

Naipes Criollos 1995

Naipes Criollos

“Naipes Criollos” Gaucho playing cards, 1995.