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Playing Cards from United Kingdom

United Kingdom

Playing cards first arrived in England during the 15th century, but none have survived from such an early date.

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35: More Design Copies

35: More Design Copies

Here I want to take another widely copied design and see how individual variation by the copier can take the original design through a lot of changes. I shall take the three USPCC designs: US3 (wide), US3.1 (bridge) and US4 (wide). To the best of my knowledge these are no longer used in the US, except perhaps for special productions, as in the retro market.

36: Minor Makers of the 19th Century

36: Minor Makers of the 19th Century

In 19th century England there were a number of makers who produced cards in relatively small quantities.

37: Late 19th Century Card-Makers and Problem Cases

37: Late 19th Century Card-Makers and Problem Cases

After the Old Frizzle period and the tax was reduced to 3d per pack, from 1862 onwards, a number of makers started up, who hadn't made cards before, although they were part of the paper and pasteboard industry.

38: Peter Gurney and Other 20th Century Minor Makers

38: Peter Gurney and Other 20th Century Minor Makers

Gurney was not the only printer who went briefly into the playing card business during the twentieth century.

39: Mixed Packs

39: Mixed Packs

A number of mixed packs appear for sale from time to time, but it's important to sort out what is meant by the term mixed. It is an issue that is not as straightforward as it might seem.

41: A Guide to Dating Playing Cards

41: A Guide to Dating Playing Cards

Dating is a particularly tricky but very interesting problem to tackle and there are many pitfalls.

46: Henry Hardy, Henry French & Christopher Groser

46: Henry Hardy, Henry French & Christopher Groser

A brief look at some makers of whom we know little.

47: Welch’s postcards and De La Rue’s redrawing 1900

47: Welch’s postcards and De La Rue’s redrawing

There are a number of court card designs that have never actually been produced as cards. It's a shame some of them never were.

49: De La Rue in detail

49: De La Rue in detail

A detailed presentation of the variants of De La Rue's standard cards.

5: De La Rue

5: De La Rue

In December 1831 Thomas de la Rue was granted his patent for printing playing cards by letterpress.

50: Joseph Reynolds

50: Joseph Reynolds

A presentation of my database of Reynolds cards.

52 ways to stop smoking

52 ways to stop smoking

“52 ways to stop smoking”, offering positive help for anyone who wants to give up smoking.

52: The Isle of Man

52: The Isle of Man

The Isle of Man has always been a tax haven within the British Isles and it has also had some interesting packs of cards.

58: Woolley & Co.

58: Woolley & Co.

The firm of Thomas Woolley lasted for many years from 1836-1904 in several different guises.

59: Owen Jones (1809-74) and De La Rue

59: Owen Jones (1809-74) and De La Rue

A selection of examples of Owen Jones's work printed by De La Rue.

60: Some less common Goodall packs, 1875-95

60: Some less common Goodall packs, 1875-95

There are some interesting packs from Goodall in the last quarter of the 19th century.

65: Adverts and related documents 1684-1877

65: Adverts and related documents 1684-1877

Here are a few early advertisements relating to cards from newspapers 1684-1759 and a number of later 19th century documents of interest.

67: Adverts and related material after 1900

67: Adverts and related material after 1900

The final page of material relating to playing cards from British periodicals.

68: Playing cards in glass

68: Playing cards in glass

My wife and I have recently commissioned a unique pair of stained glass windows for our home.

69: My Collection

69: My Collection

This is an archive list of my collection. I hope it will be of use and interest to others.