The World of Playing Cards Logo

Playing cards have been with us since the 14th century, when they first entered popular culture. Over the centuries packs of cards, in all shapes and sizes, have been used for games, gambling, education, conjuring, advertising, fortune telling, political messages or the portrayal of national or ethnic identity. All over the world, whatever language is spoken, their significance is universal. Their popularity is also due to the imaginative artwork and graphic design which is sometimes overlooked, and the “then & now” of how things have changed.

Browsing manufacturer:

Joseph Reynolds

13 Articles

Joseph Reynolds had been producing playing cards in the traditional method since c.1809.

Reynolds c.1809-1885

Joseph Reynolds had been producing playing cards in the traditional method since c.1809.

Reynolds c.1809-1885

Fortune-Telling Cards

Comic Fortune-Telling Cards published by Reynolds & Sons, c.1850.

Fortune-Telling Cards

Comic Question & Answer cards

Comic Question & Answer cards by Josh. Reynolds & Sons, circa 1850.

Comic Question & Answer cards

Wrappers

Playing cards were traditionally sold inside paper wrappers, which were usually thrown away.

Wrappers

50: Joseph Reynolds

A presentation of my database of Reynolds cards.

50: Joseph Reynolds

32: The Not-So-Minor Cardmakers of the 19th Century - Part 3

A survey of the cards made by Creswick and Hardy, with a brief mention of De La Rue, Goodall and Reynolds.

32: The Not-So-Minor Cardmakers of the 19th Century - Part 3

30: The Not-So-Minor Cardmakers of the 19th Century - Gibson, Hunt & Bancks

A preliminary look at the card-makers operating in the 19th century.

30: The Not-So-Minor Cardmakers of the 19th Century - Gibson, Hunt & Bancks

27: Cards at Strangers’ Hall, Norwich

There is a very interesting collection of playing cards held at the Strangers' Hall Museum in Norwich.

27: Cards at Strangers’ Hall, Norwich

Crowquill Transformation

Transformation playing cards designed by the illustrator, comic artist and stage designer ‘Alfred Crowquill’ (Alfred Henry Forrester, 1804-72), printed by Reynolds & Sons, c.1850.

Crowquill Transformation

20: English Card-Makers 1761-1905

An initial survey of 19th century playing-card production. More detailed information appears on other pages.

20: English Card-Makers 1761-1905

Reynolds c.1830

Woodblock and stencil playing cards, produced by Reynolds & Sons c.1830-1850.

Reynolds c.1830

Reynolds non-standard

Sometime around c.1850 Reynolds & Sons produced this non-standard or variant pack with courts inspired by Continental designs, based loosely on the French 'Paris' pattern.

Reynolds non-standard

Reynolds c.1809-1885

Joseph Reynolds had been producing playing cards in the traditional method since c.1809.

Reynolds c.1809-1885