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Playing cards have been with us since the 14th century, when they first entered popular culture. Over the centuries packs of cards, in all shapes and sizes, have been used for games, gambling, education, conjuring, advertising, fortune telling, political messages or the portrayal of national or ethnic identity. All over the world, whatever language is spoken, their significance is universal. Their popularity is also due to the imaginative artwork and graphic design which is sometimes overlooked, and the “then & now” of how things have changed.

Browsing manufacturer:

Chas Goodall and Son

31 Articles

Today nothing remains of Charles Goodall's Camden Works, where three-quarters of the playing cards printed in Britain were produced.

Chas Goodall and Son 1820-1922

Today nothing remains of Charles Goodall's Camden Works, where three-quarters of the playing cards printed in Britain were produced.

Chas Goodall and Son 1820-1922

Khanhoo

Khanhoo by Charles Goodall & Son, 1895.

Khanhoo

Rainbow

Rainbow card game and colour mixing guide printed by Goodall & Sons for Robert Johnson, c.1920.

Rainbow

66: Adverts and related material 1862-1900

Some further material relating to cards from nineteenth and twentieth century periodicals.

66: Adverts and related material 1862-1900

Ocean to Ocean Canada Souvenir

“Ocean to Ocean” Canadian Pictorial Souvenir pack by Chas Goodall & Son Ltd, c.1912.

Ocean to Ocean Canada Souvenir

Ocean to Ocean Souvenir of Canada, c.1905

Ocean to Ocean Souvenir of Canada by Chas Goodall & Son Ltd, c.1905.

Ocean to Ocean Souvenir of Canada, c.1905

Hindooly

Hindooly published by Chas Goodall & Son Ltd c.1904.

Hindooly

Progressive Whist Cards

There are references to “progressive whist” or “whist drives” during the 19th and early years of the 20th century but this form of the game came into its own during the 1920s and 30s.

Progressive Whist Cards

Historic Shakespeare

Historic Shakespeare with courts featuring Shakespearean characters, Chas Goodall & Son, 1893.

Historic Shakespeare

52: The Isle of Man

The Isle of Man has always been a tax haven within the British Isles and it has also had some interesting packs of cards.

52: The Isle of Man

Derby Day

Derby Day race game published by Parker Games’ English subsidiary at Ivy Lane, London, from 1908 to around 1920.

Derby Day

A Pair of Transformation Packs

Two similar but fascinatingly different hand-drawn transformation decks by the same artist, c.1875

A Pair of Transformation Packs

Whist and Gaming Counters and Markers

History.of Whist and Gaming Counters and Markers from the 18th Century to modern times.

Whist and Gaming Counters and Markers

Our Ship

The “New Game of Our Ship”, published by Chas Goodall & Son, London, 1896.

Our Ship

Goodall c.1845-60

Goodall’s earliest cards were traditional in appearance but in around 1845 ‘modernised’ courts were designed

Goodall c.1845-60

Goodall & Son’s Patience & Miniature packs

Goodall & Son’s Patience & Miniature packs came in various styles of box and back design, c.1890-1930.

Goodall & Son’s Patience & Miniature packs

27: Cards at Strangers’ Hall, Norwich

There is a very interesting collection of playing cards held at the Strangers' Hall Museum in Norwich.

27: Cards at Strangers’ Hall, Norwich

20: English Card-Makers 1761-1905

An initial survey of 19th century playing-card production. More detailed information appears on other pages.

20: English Card-Makers 1761-1905

12: Goodall & Son

Charles Goodall & Son, 1820-1922 and beyond.

12: Goodall & Son

7: Brands and Packs

The introduction of brands commenced during the late 19th century as a development of the old qualities: Moguls, Harrys, Highlanders and Merry Andrews.

7: Brands and Packs

Shakespeare 300th Anniversary

Shakespeare 300th Anniversary playing cards designed by John Leighton (1822-1912).

Shakespeare 300th Anniversary

Boudoir

“Boudoir” playing cards were introduced by Chas Goodall & Son in 1906 in a new, slimmer size.

Boudoir

Swastika designs

Swastika design playing cards by De La Rue, c.1925.

Swastika designs

Rameses Fortune Telling

The Rameses Fortune Telling Cards were manufactured by Chas. Goodall & Son Ltd, London, c.1910, around the same time as Rameses The Egyptian Wonderworker, was performing.

Rameses Fortune Telling

Irish Heroic

The costumes and details of this pack are in the spirit of "The Heroic Period of Irish History".

Irish Heroic

Spanish suited pack for Nestlé

Spanish-suited pack produced by Chas Goodall & Son Ltd for South America.

Spanish suited pack for Nestlé

Chas Goodall and Son 1820-1922

Today nothing remains of Charles Goodall's Camden Works, where three-quarters of the playing cards printed in Britain were produced.

Chas Goodall and Son 1820-1922