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Playing cards have been with us since the 14th century, when they first entered popular culture. Over the centuries packs of cards, in all shapes and sizes, have been used for games, gambling, education, conjuring, advertising, fortune telling, political messages or the portrayal of national or ethnic identity. All over the world, whatever language is spoken, their significance is universal. Their popularity is also due to the imaginative artwork and graphic design which is sometimes overlooked, and the “then & now” of how things have changed.

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New York Consolidated Card Company

13 Articles

The United States Playing Card Co. (USPCC) represents an amalgamation of all the major American card-makers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries

43: The United States Playing Card Co.

The United States Playing Card Co. (USPCC) represents an amalgamation of all the major American card-makers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries

43: The United States Playing Card Co.

A Case Study

Case Study: using detective work to identify and date a pack discovered in charity shop.

A Case Study

43: The United States Playing Card Co.

The United States Playing Card Co. (USPCC) represents an amalgamation of all the major American card-makers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries

43: The United States Playing Card Co.

34: Design Copies

Some copies of the designs of Goodall and the New York Consolidated Card Co.

34: Design Copies

De Luxe No.142

A wide size version of De Luxe No.142 had been published in c.1920, with a similar Ace of Spades and Joker, but which was never very popular.

De Luxe No.142

Lighthouse No.922

“Lighthouse No.922” playing cards were introduced in c.1920.

Lighthouse No.922

Triton No.42

There have been at least three different versions of the Triton deck, with different Jokers, different styles of court cards and slight differences in the lettering on the Ace of Spades and/or Joker. The cards were advertised as “double enameled”.

Triton No.42

Lawrence & Cohen

Lawrence & Cohen were successors to Lawrence, Cohen & Co.

Lawrence & Cohen

Royal Playing Cards, 1890s

Royal Playing Cards, 1890s

Royal Playing Cards, 1890s

Lewis I. Cohen

Lewis I. Cohen made his first deck of cards in 1832. In 1835 Mr Cohen invented a new machine to print four colours on a sheet at once, which was to revolutionise the entire playing card industry. This innovation soon led to his dominance in the market.

Lewis I. Cohen

New York Consolidated Card Company

The New York Consolidated Card Company was formed in 1871 by the merging of Lawrence & Cohen, Samuel Hart & Co and John J. Levy.

New York Consolidated Card Company

Samuel Hart, 1846-1871

Samuel Hart was a prolific manufacturer of playing cards who commenced business sometime around 1845 in Philadelphia. He had previously worked for L.I. Cohen.

Samuel Hart, 1846-1871

Squeezers No.35

By 1877 the New York Consolidated Card Co's "Squeezers" were a great success on account of the indices in the corners which enabled the cards to be fanned.

Squeezers No.35

Bertrand Domec, 1904-1970 page 2

Bertrand Domec page 2 (c.1905-1926).

Bertrand Domec, 1904-1970 page 2