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Paris Pattern Playing Cards

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“Deck with French suits”

“Deck with French suits”

A facsimile of an early 19th century French-suited deck from the collection of F.X. Schmid.

25: More Standard European Cards

25: More Standard European Cards

A further selection of European standard patterns including various redrawings.

Claude Weisbuch 1997

Claude Weisbuch

Free reinterpretation of the traditional Paris pattern courts by the artist Claude Weisbuch.

Dubois

Dubois

Dubois card makers from Liège in the Walloon Region of Belgium.

Forster

Forster

Deck made by Johann Jobst Forster, Nürnberg, first half of 18th century in the Paris pattern.

French Playing Cards

French Playing Cards

Some of the oldest cards still in existence come from France. During the 16th and 17th centuries France was the major supplier of playing cards in Europe.

I. Schenck, Nuremberg 1790

I. Schenck, Nuremberg

I. Schenck, Nuremberg, late XVIIIth century

Jacob Holmblad c.1820

Jacob Holmblad c.1820

Standard woodblock and stencil deck produced by Jacob Holmblad with double-ended court cards in the tradition of the French ‘Paris’ pattern. The A♥ features a red over-stamp referring to Jacob Holmblad's royal license to print playing-cards which had been granted in 1820.

Johann Matheus Backofen 1800

Johann Matheus Backofen

French-suited deck manufactured by Johann Matheus Backofen, Nürnberg c.1800.

Müller (Diessenhofen), c.1840-50. 1850

Müller (Diessenhofen), c.1840-50.

Playing Cards made by J. Müller, Diessenhofen, c.1840-50 with court cards coloured differently at each end.

Monic

Monic

‘Monic’ brand playing cards, c.1930s

P. Steinmann

P. Steinmann

Single-figure provincial Paris pattern cards with traditional names on the courts manufactured in Copenhagen by P. Steinmann, c.1820.

Paris Pattern

Paris Pattern

The Paris pattern was established as such around the middle of the seventeenth century (based, perhaps, on the cards of Hector of Troyes).

Paris pattern by Leclaire of Paris 1880

Paris pattern by Leclaire of Paris

Standard designs from a little-known Parisian maker.

Paris pattern for WWII troops 1939

Paris pattern for WWII troops

Wartime edition of standard designs with fewer colours, a special back design and an overprint.

Paris pattern variant from Lyon, c1900 1900

Paris pattern variant from Lyon, c1900

Updated courts retaining elements of a standard French pack by C. Gerentes, Lyon.

Standard French-suited Bavarian deck by Göbl

Standard French-suited Bavarian deck by Göbl

French-suited Bavarian deck by Andreas Benedict Göbl, late 18th c.

Swiss French Suited Playing Cards, c.1840 1840

Swiss French Suited Playing Cards, c.1840

French-suited playing-cards in the Paris pattern appeared in Switzerland around the end of the sixteenth century, when many Lyonnais cardmakers were driven away by heavy taxes.

Swiss Piquet Playing Cards, c.1850-60 1860

Swiss Piquet Playing Cards, c.1850-60

Piquet playing-cards made by J. Müller, Diessenhofen, c.1850-60. The full-length court cards are following the French style.