The World of Playing Cards Logo

Standard Playing Card Patterns

Patterns

Standard patterns are when a certain design becomes established in a certain region and all local manufacturers produce a version of it. It then becomes traditional in that region or in other regions where it is adopted.

Some modern patterns are descendants of patterns used three of four hundred years ago. For example, the widely-used standard Anglo-American pattern seen today derives from sixteenth century French designs.

Displaying 68 articles

Sort by: Publication Date Alphabetical Year of Production

Filter by Year of Production

Fournier’s Castilian pattern 1880

Fournier’s Castilian pattern

Designed by Emilio Soubrier, Ignacio Díaz and Augusto Rius during the 1880s as a new definitive national pattern.

Genoese pattern 1920

Genoese pattern

The design is purely 'Parisian' but the colouring is green, red, yellow and black. Belgium has taken this pattern for general use.

Genovesi Pattern

Genovesi Pattern

Genoese pattern from Italy.

Georg Kapfler 1611

Georg Kapfler

Antique deck of old Bohemian playing cards of the German type manufactured by Georg Kapfler and dated 1611.

German Saxon Pattern 1832

German Saxon Pattern

The German Saxon Pattern or “Schwerdter Karte”.

Goodall’s modernised Wüst House pattern playing cards 1915

Goodall’s modernised Wüst House pattern playing cards

A remodelled version of the first Wüst house pattern.

Hermanos Solesio

Hermanos Solesio

“Money Bag” pattern by Hermanos Solesi, late 18th c.

Introduction to Collecting Themes

Introduction to Collecting Themes

Playing cards can be broadly categorised into standard and non-standard designs, with collectors appreciating their variety.

Jonas Fouquet Navarra Pattern

Jonas Fouquet Navarra Pattern

Navarra Pattern by Jonas Fouquet, c.1720 and c.1820.

Kaffeehaus-Pikett

Kaffeehaus-Pikett

Kaffeehaus-Pikett featuring the old Viennese Large Crown pattern, made by ASS.

L. P. Holmblad c.1840

L. P. Holmblad c.1840

L. P. Holmblad's house pattern used from c.1840. The K♠ carries a harp as in the traditional French-type cards; but the J♠ is sleeping with his arms folded and his shield resting behind him.

La Española 2000  pattern

La Española 2000 pattern

‘La Española 2000’ is a digitally re-drawn version of the original classic ‘La Española’ Spanish-suited pack and is produced in several sizes (standard, round, small and pocket).

Later Bavarian Pattern 1937

Later Bavarian Pattern

Later Bavarian single-ended pattern by Vereinigte Altenburg-Stralsunder Spielkarten-Fabriken A-G., c.1937

Lombardy (or Milanesi) pattern

Lombardy (or Milanesi) pattern

The origins of the Lombardy pattern probably lie in the early 19th century when it was a full-length design. It has some affinities with the French Provence and Lyons patterns which are now obsolete.

Lyon Pattern type iii

Lyon Pattern type iii

This pattern was used in various parts of eastern France but was ultimately replaced by the official ‘Paris’ pattern in c.1780.

Modern English Court

Modern English Court

Modern English court style by Games & Print Services Limited, c.1997.

Modern Swiss-German Pattern 2000

Modern Swiss-German Pattern

Modern Swiss-German Pattern by AGMüller, c.2000.

Naipes Tipo Húngaro

Naipes Tipo Húngaro

32 cards Hungarian "Seasons" pattern, with Argentinean tax stamp and trade mark of six-pointed star on 7 of bells, c.1955-60.

Navarra Pattern

Navarra Pattern

Navarra Pattern produced for the Pamplona General Hospital Monopoly.

Navarra Pattern, 1682 1682

Navarra Pattern, 1682

Navarra pattern produced for the Pamplona General Hospital Monopoly in 1682.