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Standard Playing Card Patterns

Patterns

Standard patterns are when a certain design becomes established in a certain region and all local manufacturers produce a version of it. It then becomes traditional in that region or in other regions where it is adopted.

Some modern patterns are descendants of patterns used three of four hundred years ago. For example, the widely-used standard Anglo-American pattern seen today derives from sixteenth century French designs.

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Neapolitan Pattern

Neapolitan Pattern

Neapolitan pattern

North German Pattern

North German Pattern

The North German pattern appeared in the mid-19th century, derived from the French ‘Paris’ pattern,

Old Bavarian pattern 1780

Old Bavarian pattern

Uncut sheets of playing cards of the Old Bavarian pattern by Michael Schatzberger, Passau, c.1780.

Paris Pattern

Paris Pattern

The Paris pattern was established as such around the middle of the seventeenth century (based, perhaps, on the cards of Hector of Troyes).

Piacentine Pattern

Piacentine Pattern

Piacentine Pattern, several double-ended versions.

Piedmont Pattern

Piedmont Pattern

The Piedmont pattern is a very close relative to the French 'Paris' pattern. The courts are not named, however, and are divided horizontally (rather than diagonally).

Portuguese pattern

Portuguese pattern

19th century Portuguese pattern, re-printed from original woodblocks.

Portuguese Type Cards made in Belgium 1878

Portuguese Type Cards made in Belgium

Portuguese Type Playing Cards made in Belgium, c.1878.

Primiera Bolognese

Primiera Bolognese

Primiera Bolognese by Modiano, c.1975

Provence Pattern

Provence Pattern

The 'Provence' pattern contains figures which go back to the fifteenth century.

Prussian Pattern

Prussian Pattern

Derived from Jagdkarten or Hunting cards with patriotic overtones and rural scenes as vignettes on the numeral cards, the Prussian pattern emerged in the middle of the nineteenth century.

Rhineland Pattern by KZWP 1966

Rhineland Pattern by KZWP

Rhineland pattern by KZWP.

Romagnole pattern by Guglielmo Murari

Romagnole pattern by Guglielmo Murari

Romagnole pattern by Guglielmo Murari c.1920

Salzburger Pattern

Salzburger Pattern

Salzburger pattern by Ferd. Piatnik & Söhne, Vienna

Sarde Pattern 1975

Sarde Pattern

Sarde pattern published by Modiano, c.1975, based on early XIX century Spanish model.

Sicilian Pattern

Sicilian Pattern

The Sicilian pack has a similar composition to the Neapolitan pack, and is small and squat in appearance.

Skat Express

Skat Express

One end Berlin pattern the other standard English pattern

Small Tuscan Pattern

Small Tuscan Pattern

Small Tuscan Pattern

Spanish Cadiz-style pack 1952

Spanish Cadiz-style pack

Traditional Spanish Cadiz-style pack manufactured by Müller & Cie, Schaffhausen, 1952.

Standard and Non-standard Playing Cards

Standard and Non-standard Playing Cards

Standard playing cards are based upon traditional designs and are used for card games.